#58 – Lucas Azeredo Lobo — Teaching Speed, How To Best Implement Conditioning, and Why Moving in Multiple Planes Matters

 

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PC: Jeremy Dupont 

 

This week on the #CLP we are joined by a guest we have been training to get on for months, A graduate of Queens University and former collegiate soccer player, Lucas Azerado-Lobo is the director of Intern Education for GRHPT and is undoubtedly the best on-field speed coach we know. It was awesome to have him on the podcast to discuss speed development, plyometric training, how to incorporate conditioning into your workouts, and why he is so passionate about education. We also have a great discussion on speed ladders and the limits of the traditional cardio equipment.

Please enjoy this week’s episode and we look forward to hearing how you are implementing conditioning into your own training.

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Liked the Episode? Try Something Similiar.

Doug Davidson 

Matt Webster


Follow Lucas

Instagram – @lucasazerlobo

Twitter – @lucasazerlobo


This Podcast is Brought To You By

Our Mothers

Thanks to Karen and Anne for bringing us into this world and keeping us alive long enough to screw it up ourselves.

Biosteel Sports Nutrition

Biosteel Sports Nutrition is Toronto based company, and a leader in high-performance sports drinks for professional athletes and everyday champions alike.

A product created out of necessity and is trusted by athletes like Connor McDavid, Brooke Henderson, Rosie MacLennan and Andrew Wiggins. They have a full line of products, including their signature High-Performance Sports Drink and Advanced Recovery Formula Protein plus a brand new rooster of Biosteel Green Powder.

Living like a champion requires championship nutrition and there’s no one we trust more.

Enter Promo Code – ChampLifestyle at www.biosteel.com for 15% Off the Next Order

Facts on Fat | Part 1

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Fats are back! The wave of “low-fat” items is slowing dissipating and in its place an influx of “healthy fat” options! As wonderful as it is to see there is still some confusion on what exactly a “healthy fat” is, how much we should be consuming, and when we should be consuming these fats.

Firstly, fats are essential for life; we must take in a particular amount in order to survive and thrive. Dietary fats play several roles in the body, including but not limited to:

  • Helping to transport our fat-soluble vitamins into our cells (ADEK, Iron, and beta-carotene)
  • Helping to maintain a consistent body temperature
  • Certain healthy fats act as potent anti-inflammatory agents.
  • Improving our cardiovascular health
  • Providing a source of long-lasting energy
  • Helping to improve body composition
  • Supporting hormone balance and boosting recovery from intense workouts.
  • Improving cognitive function
  • Helping to boost our immune system
  • Improving bone and skin health

In Part 1 we’ll examine two types of dietary fat: Monounsaturated and Polyunsaturated

Monounsaturated fats are our simplest form of fats. The chemical structure contains one double bond, they are often liquid at room temperature and are essential to take in through our diets (we do not produce them internally). The most common and easily recognizable monounsaturated fat source is olive oil, containing the fatty acid oleic acid which has been associated with decreasing cardiovascular disease, improving brain function and decreasing body fat. Other great sources of monounsaturated fat include nuts, avocados, whole milk etc.

Polyunsaturated fats are similar to monounsaturated fat but with some unique qualities, including the existence of several double bonds in their chemical make-up. Both Monounsaturated and Polyunsaturated have anti-inflammatory properties, both can improve cardiovascular and cognitive function.

The major difference is that Polyunsaturated fats contain Omega 6 and Omega 3 fatty acids. Omega-3 fatty acids have several anti-inflammatory benefits and can be found in wild salmon, mackerel sardines, krill or plant-based sources like flax seeds, chia and hemp seeds.

On the other hand, Omega 6 fatty acids can be anti-inflammatory or pro-inflammatory depending on the specific type, personal predisposition and overall toxic load amongst other things. They are very vulnerable and delicate to heat and oxidation and can trigger an inflammatory cascade within the body if mismanaged. In a traditional Western diet, most Omega 6’s are consumed via refined oils. Examples of refined oils – altered from their original state- containing Omega 6’s include, Safflower, Canola, Soy, Corn, and Sunflower. The goal is to consume a balanced amount of Omega 3’s to 6’s for optimal benefits, avoiding refined oils. 

In Part 2 we will be discussing the other two types of fats receiving a lot of mainstream attention: Saturated and Trans Fats.

#57 – Top 3 Tools for Improving Your Lifestyle and Business

 

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PC: Jeremy Dupont 

 

Welcome back Champions! This week on the #CLP we take a look at our Top 3 Most Influential Practices and Products of the last 6 months. Being involved in the health and wellness industry requires the ability to make intelligent and applicable recommendations for optimizing life, basically, we end up trying several products and practices every couple of months. Today’s episode highlights the best of the best from the last half year of exploration. Let us know what you’ve been incorporating and what we should try next!

(Loved Us? Hated Us? Rate and leave a review here)


LINKS

Day Designer Journal

Audible

Mushroom Coffee

SNL Skit


This Podcast is Brought To You By

Our Mothers

Thanks to Karen and Anne for bringing us into this world and keeping us alive long enough to screw it up ourselves.

Biosteel Sports Nutrition

Biosteel Sports Nutrition is Toronto based company, and a leader in high-performance sports drinks for professional athletes and everyday champions alike.

A product created out of necessity and is trusted by athletes like Connor McDavid, Brooke Henderson, Rosie MacLennan and Andrew Wiggins. They have a full line of products, including their signature High-Performance Sports Drink and Advanced Recovery Formula Protein plus a brand new rooster of Biosteel Green Powder.

Living like a champion requires championship nutrition and there’s no one we trust more.

Enter Promo Code – ChampLifestyle at www.biosteel.com for 15% Off the Next Order

Strength Training for Young Athletes | Will Lifting Weights Stunt Growth?

Youth Training

Below is an exact quote from a parent who called this week looking for advice on what sort of offseason program would be best for their son and his athletic development.

“I don’t want my kid to lift any heavy weights, stay away from compressions, he still has to grow right.”

It’s fitting that this week’s breakdown is focused on youth training and athletic development following my phone conversation. North America has placed a premium on winning in sports, and, despite the participation medals showing up at some events, the competition and stress that young athletes face are higher now than ever before. This has led to the “unbroken season”, a term we’re now using to describe the never-ending slew of leagues, tournaments, camps, and development sessions. The idea of “working on my game” has become hyper-focused and what is required for success is being dictated by well-meaning, but not always knowledgeable coaches and parents.

Before we discuss strength training for young athletes, and if you are a parent reading this, before you spend a single dollar on strength training put your child in a different sport, please, they will thank you. We’ve spent over a decade in high-level athletics and the best in the world played it all.

The “ unbroken season’ has led to a phenomenon of  ‘early specialization’, which in layman terms means, the athlete is moderately competent at one activity and horrendous at any others. They can stickhandle a puck but not dribble a ball, pull an oar but not kick a ball, swing a bat but not set a volley. You get the idea. The discussion on LTAD (Long Term Athletic Development) is one for a different time but I would be shrinking my duty if I didn’t at least mention it briefly before you invest in strength training start with a different sport.

Assuming that you have enrolled your young athlete in a second or even third sport, and they want to start strength training lets answer a few of the more common questions.

Should My Young Athlete Lift Weights?

Absolutely, for a few different reasons. Firstly, becoming stronger is never a bad thing, although most of the improvements at their age will be neurological they will notice results relatively quickly. The improvement in strength will make them faster, more stable, less likely to get injured, and generally better at their sport. By no means should they be focusing on improving their bench press one rep max or getting under a squat bar with hundreds of pounds on it. Focusing on quality movements, with excellent technique under an appropriate load.

Will Strength Training Stunt Their Growth?

At this point, the research is quite clear that lifting weights does not have adverse effects on the growth rate of youth athletes or affect their “linear” development. The specific area of concern is the epiphyseal plate, or, growth plate. This area is a cartilaginous section at the end of bones that allows for growth during childhood but hardens fully in adulthood, ending the growing process. The myth and concern is that adding load to the body will prematurely close the plate. This has since been disproved and proper weightlifting may actually have a positive influence on bone density and bone mineralization. (1)

When Should They Start and How Often Should They Train?

This is a hard question to answer, individual levels in maturity, puberty, training age, and motivation can range significantly amongst athletes of the same age. (2)There are benefits to lifting pre-puberty that are not impacted until physical maturation. It helps to have an unbiased coach to assess and recommend but as a general statement, we do not work with athletes under the age of twelve. We suggest twice a week, 45- 50 minutes including a warm up and cool down component with an almost overbearing emphasis on technique. The frequency and intensity of the workouts can increase as the athlete’s physical maturation and training age increases.

Sources

1. Pediatrics, April 2008, VOLUME 121 / ISSUE 4, American Academy of Pediatrics
2. Patel DR, Soares N, Wells K. Neurodevelopmental readiness of children for participation in sports. Translational Pediatrics. 2017;6(3):167-173. doi:10.21037/tp.2017.05.03.

#56 – NHL Edition — Highlights From Mark Scheifele and Steven Stamkos

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NHL Playoff Edition! This week on the podcast we’re bringing you a highlight pack of our favourite moments from the podcasts we recorded last year with #55 of the Winnipeg Jets, MarkScheifele, and #91 of the Tampa Bay Lightning, Steven Stamkos. As both players and their teams chase the Stanley Cup find out what goes on behind the scenes, when they realized they wanted to play hockey for a living, and funny fan interactions. Enjoy! Rate! Review!

(Loved Us? Hated Us? Rate and leave a review here)


This Podcast is Brought To You By

Our Mothers

Thanks to Karen and Anne for bringing us into this world and keeping us alive long enough to screw it up ourselves.

Biosteel Sports Nutrition

Biosteel Sports Nutrition is Toronto based company, and a leader in high-performance sports drinks for professional athletes and everyday champions alike.

A product created out of necessity and is trusted by athletes like Connor McDavid, Brooke Henderson, Rosie MacLennan and Andrew Wiggins. They have a full line of products, including their signature High-Performance Sports Drink and Advanced Recovery Formula Protein plus a brand new rooster of Biosteel Green Powder.

Living like a champion requires championship nutrition and there’s no one we trust more.

Enter Promo Code – ChampLifestyle at www.biosteel.com for 15% Off the Next Order